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  • SharkyForums.Com - Print: RDRAM Versions?

    RDRAM Versions?
    By ua549 June 10, 2001, 02:18 PM

    What are the different configurations of RDRAM?
    I know that modules can be 16bit or 18bit, i.e., ECC or non-ECC, of different capacities and one of four different speeds -
    53.3ns/600Mbps(300MHz, PC600)
    45ns/711Mbps(356MHz, PC700)
    45ns/800Mbps(400MHz, PC800)
    40ns/800Mbps(400MHz, PC800).
    Do all modules support serial presence detect(SPD)?
    Are all modules registered?

    RDRAM products seem to be advertised only by speed, capacity and error correction capabilities.

    By pm June 11, 2001, 12:01 AM

    I have heard rumors that there's one more set of differences to consider: stepping/version. I've heard that never revs of silicon (ver. D, IIRC) have significantly lower power and latency compared to older revs.

    By Mr.Squish June 11, 2001, 02:38 AM

    i havent seen any type of ram that doesnt have SPD in a long time... And no, not all ram is registered. You dont need registered ram. its mostly used in servers

    By sww June 11, 2001, 09:40 AM

    Um, he's setting up a multi-p4 Xeon setup...he might need registered RDRAM...

    quote:Originally posted by Mr.Squish:
    i havent seen any type of ram that doesnt have SPD in a long time... And no, not all ram is registered. You dont need registered ram. its mostly used in servers

    By ua549 June 11, 2001, 10:38 AM

    My requirements are for 8 sticks of 256MB registered PC800 ECC memory. (The 512MB modules cost 3 times the wholesale price of US$175 for a 256MB module.) One vendor has product listings for memory with and without SPD. No one lists unbuffered or registered specs. I've already ordered a Samsung product, but I was very curious since I can't nail down the actual specs. Tyan has not responded to my inquiry and the board manual does not mention an SPD spec.

    By ua549 June 11, 2001, 06:01 PM

    As I suspected, there is no such thing as registered RDRAM. It is all unbuffered.

    The process of registering consumes a clock. That would certainly slow down a computer.

    By Mr.Squish June 12, 2001, 12:22 AM

    quote:Originally posted by ua549:
    As I suspected, there is no such thing as registered RDRAM. It is all unbuffered.

    The process of registering consumes a clock. That would certainly slow down a computer.


    It does slow it down... but when you have very large amounts of ram, it prevents data integrety loss... It helps a great deal with stability. Your probably gonna want to stick with SPD. All the tyan boards i've seen seem to be very picky on the memory requirements...

    Sww...
    I had no idea he was setting up a quad xeon system.

    By naukkis June 12, 2001, 03:56 PM

    quote:Originally posted by ua549:
    As I suspected, there is no such thing as registered RDRAM. It is all unbuffered.

    The process of registering consumes a clock. That would certainly slow down a computer.

    As I know rdram is registered by every second memory chip's integrated controller which also (de)multiplexes data into chips. With that they have also get rid turn-around latensies so it actually makes memory faster.

    And I'm sorry about my poor english.


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