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  • SharkyForums.Com - Print: Is it physically possible to create a quiet, high-speed fan?

    Is it physically possible to create a quiet, high-speed fan?
    By tu2thepoo August 04, 2001, 05:21 AM

    I mean, something on the order of a Panasonic Panaflo, but at 2x the speed? I'm guessing no, because of air resistance, doppler effect, and all that jazz, but is it possible to create something that would come close to that? Say, a 7000rpm fan that, with some kind of noise muffling-liquid bearing technology, would only make a "woooosh" sound from the airflow?

    By ua549 August 04, 2001, 09:48 AM

    The noise from most high rpm fans is from air movement, not noisy bearings. Higher rpm isn't necessarily what is needed for better cooling. It is proper airflow. This can be achieved by closing extra openings in your case. Make sure the case fans are working together, not against each other. Coordinated airflow is the key for proper cooling. Here is a whitepaper on thermal design guidlines from Intel. Although most of the paper will not be of direct benefit to you, there is a good section about setting up case cooling. It also describes how to test effectiveness of your cooling setup. (Not for the meek).

    By way2funni August 07, 2001, 11:48 PM

    quote:Originally posted by tu2thepoo:
    I mean, something on the order of a Panasonic Panaflo, but at 2x the speed? I'm guessing no, because of air resistance, doppler effect, and all that jazz, but is it possible to create something that would come close to that? Say, a 7000rpm fan that, with some kind of noise muffling-liquid bearing technology, would only make a "woooosh" sound from the airflow?

    Read your post. Made me think of something.

    Back in the 50's , someone designed a quiet vacuume cleaner. I mean QUIET.

    Wanna know something?
    They couldn't sell it.

    You see, the end consumer equated NOISE with POWER.
    They went back to making noisy vacuume cleaners.

    Go figure.

    By Strogian August 08, 2001, 12:02 AM

    Really? They ACTUALLY made one? I remember reading something about that recently.. It said something about the companies not wanting to make vacuum cleaners quiet, since people wouldn't think they're doing anything. But I didn't know it's actually been tried! What were they called? I want to search for one on ebay. =)

    By Moridin August 08, 2001, 12:35 PM

    I don't think it would be possible to make a "quiet" fan, but one nice solution would be active noise cancellation, which could effectively make your entire case silent no matter how much sound your fan produced.

    By Klion August 08, 2001, 03:11 PM

    Hrmm, is it actually true that certain frequencies can totally cancel other frequencies effectively nuetrilizing both sounds? I seen that on some show, wondering if it was total science fiction or had any basis in fact.

    As for this topic i think it would be more likely that if noise ever becomes an issue instead of making the fans more quiet, they will just insulate the fan or the cases so the noise cannot be heard. Hard to do while maintaining air flow, but prolly a more viable solution for something such as CPU fans :P

    -Kli

    By hobbes2112 August 08, 2001, 03:20 PM

    quote:Originally posted by Moridin:
    I don't think it would be possible to make a "quiet" fan, but one nice solution would be active noise cancellation, which could effectively make your entire case silent no matter how much sound your fan produced.

    I have worked on active noise suppresion before, I promise to you that it is possible! Also you have heard of the Commanche Helicopter right? This is a very quiet example of "fan" design.


    How much are you willing to pay for quiet fans though? They are not cheap.

    By ILoveMyLude August 12, 2001, 05:03 AM

    The problem with active noise cancelling is that the two waves have exactly the right phase difference. Depending on the frequencies involved, this can mean that you have active cancelling only in certain positions in the room relative to the source, and you would actually be augmenting the sound in other positions (where there is no phase difference).

    By FeLicKz August 12, 2001, 11:23 PM

    BUY A MAC!!! they have an aluminum case with no fans!!..amayzing huh?

    By Moridin August 12, 2001, 11:56 PM

    quote:Originally posted by ILoveMyLude:
    The problem with active noise cancelling is that the two waves have exactly the right phase difference. Depending on the frequencies involved, this can mean that you have active cancelling only in certain positions in the room relative to the source, and you would actually be augmenting the sound in other positions (where there is no phase difference).

    It should be possible to reduce the noise outside the case using directional speakers pointed outward from the source of the noise. Of course this would not be perfect, but I think it could be done.

    By ua549 August 14, 2001, 08:34 AM

    By selecting high quality low noise components, I was able to quiet my PC so that it cannot be heard unless the disk is being accessed. I replaced all the small high rpm fans with 2 large low rpm ball bearing fans. One fan operates in pressure mode while the other operates in vacume mode. I blocked unnecessary case vents and channeled the airflow over the heat sources. I replaced the power supply with a very quiet Enermax unit. I added a dust filter for the air intake which helps block sound as well.

    I'm happy with the results.

    By Kunal August 14, 2001, 08:27 PM

    Don't know if this is related, but there is a company that produces "quiet" parts for PC's. I don't know if their system's will be as quiet/effective as they'd like us to believe, but it definitly got me thinking.

    IE, hard disks prove to produce phenominal ammounts of noise, especially when your running four disk 36gig 10k SCSI RAID10 arrays. Using some form of soundproofing, and a hard drive waterblock (i'm presuming this system has water cooling ) you could effectively cool your hot drives, and reduce noise substantially.

    By Kunal August 14, 2001, 08:29 PM

    Just add the link: http://www.quietpc.com/silentdrive.html
    Although this drive state's it would be unsuitable for SCSI10k/15k, the idea could be adapted with a built in waterblock.

    This way, all you'd need is some big low rev fan's, and a quiet pump.

    By hobbes2112 August 15, 2001, 10:51 PM

    quote:Originally posted by ua549:
    By selecting high quality low noise components, I was able to quiet my PC so that it cannot be heard unless the disk is being accessed. I replaced all the small high rpm fans with 2 large low rpm ball bearing fans. One fan operates in pressure mode while the other operates in vacume mode. I blocked unnecessary case vents and channeled the airflow over the heat sources. I replaced the power supply with a very quiet Enermax unit. I added a dust filter for the air intake which helps block sound as well.

    I'm happy with the results.

    Have you done any flow meter testing? How much do the filters choke the flow? I've been considering this for one of my computers that runs in a dirty warehouse...but it already runs hot (50 C) so I don't want to cut it off.


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