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  • SharkyForums.Com - Print: MP3 encoding software

    MP3 encoding software
    By Gerbil October 20, 2000, 07:43 PM

    I want to re-encode some of my MP3 files. I want to change them from 192kbps to 64kbps. What's a good program to do this with?

    By The Grinch October 20, 2000, 10:31 PM

    Why would you want to convert them? 64K sounds like crap. 128K is the lowest you want to go. Anything less is robbery.

    Check out http://mp3.box.sk/
    You should be able to find good information there. Look under encoders and decoders.

    By Gerbil October 20, 2000, 10:45 PM

    I don't think 64k is to bad. I aggree that 128kb is good, but I have a MP3 player and I want to put as much much music as possible on it.

    When one 3-4 minute song takes up 6mb's, you aren't gonna be able to fit nearly as many songs as you would if they were only 1.5mb's.

    By rock October 23, 2000, 10:21 AM

    I've settled for encoding at 96kbs for my Rio player - nice inbetween.

    The software I use is GoldWave. Great for .wav editing, but to save in mp3 format, you need to grab an external .dll (blade or another one). It's easy to setup, though - with clear directions in the help file. Plus it's shareware without annoying limitations, just tracks your use and reminds you occasionally.

    By Humus October 24, 2000, 02:23 PM

    How can people think that 64kbit MP3 sounds OK? I mean, are you deaf? I can barely accept 128kbit, even at 256kbit/s there are audible artecfacts.

    By llreye October 24, 2000, 04:55 PM

    Perhaps cheap speakers.
    -MKC

    By Gerbil October 24, 2000, 05:45 PM

    Humus, why don't you try this:

    Insert 1 music Cd into your computer's cd drive and listen. Does it sound like crap and have artifacts? I thought so. You have cheap speakers.

    128kb sounds pretty dammmm good.

    By Humus October 25, 2000, 07:17 AM

    quote:Originally posted by Gerbil:
    Humus, why don't you try this:

    Insert 1 music Cd into your computer's cd drive and listen. Does it sound like crap and have artifacts? I thought so. You have cheap speakers.

    128kb sounds pretty dammmm good.

    I don't get your point, should I be able to hear artefacts due to compression if I have cheap speakers? It's the other way around, with cheap speakers there will be less sound quality difference between the CD and the mp3.
    I don't have cheap speakers and CDs doesn't sound like crap. I have my computer connected right to my stereo, and I can tell you that mp3 sux so much ass I don't even consider using it below 160kbit/s.
    I mainly use LQT and MP+, which have much better compression with almost no audible artefacts. With mp3 you can still hear mp3 artefacts all the way up to 320kbit/s in many cases.
    If you want decent audio output in 64bit/s, try WMA or VQF (if prefiltered with lowpass 22050Hz). Also consider OGG (www.vorbis.com).

    By IL96 October 25, 2000, 04:28 PM

    Good (maybe the best) m3 encoder is Audiograbber.

    encoding up to 320 kbps

    By Humus October 26, 2000, 08:00 AM

    quote:Originally posted by IL96:
    Good (maybe the best) m3 encoder is Audiograbber.

    encoding up to 320 kbps

    Yeah, but why use mp3 when there are numerous much better formats? Mp+ @ ~130kbps VBR is usually better than mp3 @ 320kbps.

    By IL96 October 26, 2000, 09:05 AM

    RE to the message right above /\

    Dude i seriously doubt that any kind of algorithm can compress music @130 kbps and make it sound better than 320 kbs witha different algorithm. Post a link to this stuff, I'd be glad to take a look.

    By rock October 26, 2000, 10:49 AM

    There's an important point that must be made that I think some of you are missing.

    Besides "bitrate" (ie, 64kb/s vs. 128 kb/s) there's also "sampling rate" (CD-quality is sampled at 44KHz).

    If you make a 128kbs mp3 at 44KHz, it will sound pretty darn good. If you make a 64kbs mp3 at 22KHz, it can sound nearly as good - especially on normal PC speakers or in a car doing 75mph. BUT if you make a 64kbs mp3 at 44KHz - you're going to have some serious aliasing and artifacts - and it will sound like crap on any speaker. There's just not enough bandwidth at 64kbs to push through that much data.

    The point - there are 2 variables here, not just one. If you're going to encode an mp3 at a slower bitrate, be sure to decrease the sampling rate at the same time. You may think 44KHz is always better than 22KHz (or 11KHz), but it's not! Keyword: aliasing.

    By IL96 October 26, 2000, 01:46 PM

    22 kHz Stereo ?? you've gotta be kiddin me. Cutting off half the sound... If you are talking mono, it may be alright .. for some f us.. with one ear... i got two, how about you folks ?

    By rock October 27, 2000, 10:26 AM

    Have you ever listened to the difference between a 44KHz sound and a 22KHz sound? Really? The highest frequencies of Type1 waves are the first to be attenuated, and the most easily lost. Unless you've got a superwonderful tweeter setup, you won't see a difference. Besides, this whole discussion is based on encoding MP3s - and if you wan't really good quality sound, MP3s aren't the way to go in the first place. Do a blind test of a 44KHz wav and a 22KHz wav and can you really say something about the difference?

    Next - I was discussion encoding a 128kbs mp3 at 44KHz vs 22KHz. Do the same blind test - which sounds better? I'll stake anything the 22 does. Why? No aliasing of the high-frequencies. There'll be a very noticeable "twanginess" to high-pitched sounds (eg, guitars in Zeppelin). It's gone when encoded at 22KHz. Less "full" sound - but it's an mp3 anyway - and now it's not aliased = less "full" but more "accurate".

    By Humus October 27, 2000, 06:34 PM

    quote:Originally posted by IL96:
    RE to the message right above /\

    Dude i seriously doubt that any kind of algorithm can compress music @130 kbps and make it sound better than 320 kbs witha different algorithm. Post a link to this stuff, I'd be glad to take a look.

    Of course it can. May I remind you that for example a standard MPEG movie have a compression rate of about 1/30 with good quality. But a MPEG4 movie will have about 1/50 with about equal quality. The same goes with music.

    Here's a mp+ homepage: http://mpegplus.cjb.net/

    Here the authors site: http://come.to/mpegplus
    He explains it better than me how it works.

    By Humus October 27, 2000, 06:37 PM

    quote:Originally posted by IL96:
    22 kHz Stereo ?? you've gotta be kiddin me. Cutting off half the sound... If you are talking mono, it may be alright .. for some f us.. with one ear... i got two, how about you folks ?

    If you prefilter the sound before encoding it in an audio app like CoolEdit you'll find that 22KHz may sound rather good. 22KHz sampling rate allows frequencies up to 11KHz, and most of the sound above that is of very low amplitude.


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