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  • SharkyForums.Com - Print: Question about your schooling and your job

    Question about your schooling and your job
    By da_finster November 28, 2000, 10:09 AM

    Well the title pretty much explains it. I'm in college right now and I hate it, I'm majoring in Comp Sci. and a lot of people I know said they could just o get a job right now for 40K a year. Frankly my dad doesn't make that much and if I could have it all to myself that would be awesome. So, I am wondering what you guys have done for education and what type of jobs you've gotten from it. P.S. Don't flame this please

    By nkeezer November 28, 2000, 10:15 AM

    It's a lame answer, but I'll qualify it: Stay in school.

    I have a job now where I could probably be making 60-75k a year if I could devote all my time to it. Not bad, but I'd have to drop out of school and lose a lot of my earning potential by doing so. If I finish up with all my education, not only will I get to do what I really want (doctor), but I'll earn a hell of a lot more money too.

    Look at it this way: if you leave school now, you might be making that 40k. But that's about all you'll be making for a long time coming. And even though it may sound like a lot, it starts to disappear real quickly once you figure in little things like family and mortgage payments.

    quote:Originally posted by da_finster:
    Well the title pretty much explains it. I'm in college right now and I hate it, I'm majoring in Comp Sci. and a lot of people I know said they could just o get a job right now for 40K a year. Frankly my dad doesn't make that much and if I could have it all to myself that would be awesome. So, I am wondering what you guys have done for education and what type of jobs you've gotten from it. P.S. Don't flame this please

    By BoogyMan November 28, 2000, 10:16 AM

    quote:Originally posted by da_finster:
    Well the title pretty much explains it. I'm in college right now and I hate it, I'm majoring in Comp Sci. and a lot of people I know said they could just o get a job right now for 40K a year. Frankly my dad doesn't make that much and if I could have it all to myself that would be awesome. So, I am wondering what you guys have done for education and what type of jobs you've gotten from it. P.S. Don't flame this please

    Finish school. The money will still be there.

    If you get out now, someday you will wish you stayed in college. Trust me, it's a hell of a lot harder to go back once you've been out.

    By -= HaX0r =- November 28, 2000, 10:25 AM

    .I replied in the other forum.

    By BloodRed November 28, 2000, 11:25 AM

    I joined the AF right after high school, and have had plenty of technical training in computer communications, networks, PCs, and more, plus I have supervisory experience and tons of hands on experience, all before I've even gotten my associates degree in commputer info systems. All I need for the associates is to finish off a few math and english classes, which I'm avoiding at all costs Anyway, my friends and I have walked out of AF schools and had companies lined up outside to offer us jobs for $40k+, just from our current training ang experience. Looking online, we've found jobs that we qualify for that start at around $80k. Not bad, but I'm still going to stick to the AF and at least get something better than an associates before I try to get out and make the big bucks. So the moral of the story is, you can probably make some pretty good money now, but finish what you're doing and you'll make even more down the road. $40k seems like a lot now, but later on when you realize you could have been making $70k+ if you'd stayed in college, it won't seem like much at all.

    By Adisharr November 28, 2000, 11:35 AM

    Just keep in mind that in order to be really valuable to an employer it never hurts to know things other than your curriculum. If your in CS, get some EE experience as well. Believe me, there are a lot of guys out there in IT that don't know an IDE cable from a ATX cable.

    The day will come when IT guys are a dime a dozen. How will you distinguish yourself from all the foreign competition when they are better educated?

    Another thing that gets overlooked is personallity. If your an a******, you won't get as far. It never hurts to take some 'people skills' types courses. The people making the most money in the world are generally not that 'technically smart' but are rather 'socially smart'.

    In the end, do what you need to be happy in the long run and start putting money away in a 401K as soon as you get your first career job. Believe me, I waited too long.

    $ .02

    By kid A November 28, 2000, 04:55 PM

    quote:Originally posted by da_finster:
    Well the title pretty much explains it. I'm in college right now and I hate it, I'm majoring in Comp Sci. and a lot of people I know said they could just o get a job right now for 40K a year. Frankly my dad doesn't make that much and if I could have it all to myself that would be awesome. So, I am wondering what you guys have done for education and what type of jobs you've gotten from it. P.S. Don't flame this please

    I am in a pretty similar position to you, so I can't give you much advise apart from follow the scheme I'm doing: Finish what you are doing before you start working. It is important to have a full education instead of just a partial one. Imagine when there isn't such a demand for IT expertise and you suddenly lose your job... You would be way down the pecking order for a new job compared to someone who has a full education.

    By PiNoY2oo1 November 28, 2000, 04:58 PM

    im in high school and im a student

    By Sol November 28, 2000, 05:21 PM

    Stay in school. However, where can you start making 40k a year? where do you live? Get a good foundation. I got my degree in computer science, but I took some EE classes also. Take advantage of it while you can. Good Luck

    By bLaZe November 28, 2000, 05:25 PM

    whats EE and IT and stuff

    By Mr. Wampus November 28, 2000, 07:18 PM

    I guess Ol' Wampus will put in his two cents. I work for a LARGE multi-national financial institution. I negotiate contracts for technology equipment, and I'm well compensated for my efforts. I've been in the tech business in one way or another since 1986 (since college). My college degree was economics.

    I'm telling you all of this because the only thing I used my econ degree for was to look around and realize that tech was the business to be in. (and it doesn't take an economist to see that now.) I learned all my tech on the job.

    The point of this seemingly pointless rambling, is that most companies value a person with (A) diverse skills, and (B) a person with the dedication to complete what they start. When I hire a new person for my team, I look at their education and/or military experience. Not having a college degree doesn't automatically disqualify someone, but it knocks them down in the pile. And, it doesn't matter what the degree is, either. It's the DEGREE itself that tells an employer that you can finish what you start.

    College is hard. It's supposed to be. Will it prepare you for a career? Not really, it's not what you learn in the classroom, it's the overall experience.

    College teaches you how to think critically, how to manage stress, how to juggle projects and schedules, and how to prioritize, how to deal with difficult teachers (bosses?) and so forth and so on. Guess what skills businesses want...

    By BoogyMan November 28, 2000, 07:31 PM

    quote:Originally posted by Mr. Wampus:
    I guess Ol' Wampus will put in his two cents. I work for a LARGE multi-national financial institution. I negotiate contracts for technology equipment, and I'm well compensated for my efforts. I've been in the tech business in one way or another since 1986 (since college). My college degree was economics.

    I'm telling you all of this because the only thing I used my econ degree for was to look around and realize that tech was the business to be in. (and it doesn't take an economist to see that now.) I learned all my tech on the job.

    The point of this seemingly pointless rambling, is that most companies value a person with (A) diverse skills, and (B) a person with the dedication to complete what they start. When I hire a new person for my team, I look at their education and/or military experience. Not having a college degree doesn't automatically disqualify someone, but it knocks them down in the pile. And, it doesn't matter what the degree is, either. It's the DEGREE itself that tells an employer that you can finish what you start.

    College is hard. It's supposed to be. Will it prepare you for a career? Not really, it's not what you learn in the classroom, it's the overall experience.

    College teaches you how to think critically, how to manage stress, how to juggle projects and schedules, and how to prioritize, how to deal with difficult teachers (bosses?) and so forth and so on. Guess what skills businesses want...

    My god that was good Wampus!

    I am utterly speechless, you have said it perfectly, precisely, and left nothing to the imagination.

    Nice job man!

    By kid A November 28, 2000, 07:36 PM

    quote:Originally posted by Mr. Wampus:

    College is hard. It's supposed to be. Will it prepare you for a career? Not really, it's not what you learn in the classroom, it's the overall experience.


    I like what you have to share with us, but you just highlighted the things that makes college a drag if it's not going your way.

    You have to remember that you are not actually learning much useful stuff, but you just have to do it. Now how encouraging is that?

    By Sol November 28, 2000, 08:21 PM

    quote:Originally posted by kid A:
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Mr. Wampus:
    [b]
    College is hard. It's supposed to be. Will it prepare you for a career? Not really, it's not what you learn in the classroom, it's the overall experience.


    I like what you have to share with us, but you just highlighted the things that makes college a drag if it's not going your way.

    You have to remember that you are not actually learning much useful stuff, but you just have to do it. Now how encouraging is that?

    [/B][/QUOTE]

    Also, getting a degree shows future employers that you can put your mind to something and finish it. Just becuase college is a drag, maybe you arent studying the right thing, get out, have fun. learn. Simple as that. If you feel like you arent learning anything then look into another school, or another major.

    By Phoenix November 28, 2000, 09:13 PM

    Without a degree you might not have too much job security. After my brother's sophomore year Motorola offered he a job in the 60k range plus bonus(had a friend who was offered 80k, who also turned down the offer after his junior year). He turned it down to finish school and get his degree, an EE major without a degree doesn't really have alot of job security.

    By kid A November 29, 2000, 07:29 AM

    Like I said, you need to finish your education.

    By Dectek November 29, 2000, 10:21 AM

    I recieved an AS in Computer Sci. and Accounting and ran right out and got a job repairing cars. I now repair soda vending machines, cooler boxes, soda despensing systems, and liquor despensing systems. I make 48K and find that I use little of what my Major in college was designed for. However having a degree under my belt did help. Think of it my manager makes 65k and his degree is in wildlife conservation.

    STAY IN SCHOOL...IT IS A MEAN WORLD OUT THERE>>>SAVOR WHAT YOU HAVE NOW.

    By Mr. Wampus November 30, 2000, 05:21 PM

    So, what did you decide to do, da_finster? Wampus and the gang want to know. We care about all the fish in the shark tank.

    By nerf December 01, 2000, 04:15 AM

    My wife is a Doctor (nkeezer) and if $ is your motivation look else where. that should be your last motivation for that profession. if you started and stoped your not serious anyway. you think its hard, getting a BS or BA, Med school is sooooooooo much harder you cant imagine. if you dont want it youll never make it.
    Ahhhh educaton. i my self have a MS degree in finance from a good business school. what no one eluded to was you'll never make any real $ working for someone else. 40k doesn't cut it. multiply that by a factor of ten and now you talking. educaton, a degree is a piece of paper you can show some one. it may make your parents happy and look good hanging on the wall. A BS or BA tells employers you can stay the course and achieve a goal but not much more. Bill Gates got a degree? No Bill Gates got a business. ok, you get the point. if you want to be a CPA, MD, JD, you need the paper. dont forget that if you get your wize bang degree from a zero school, whats the point. think kids with Yale educations have trouble getting a job? Think a guy with a JD from USC law school sharpens pencils all day?
    I worked in the corp sector for a while and determined that working for yourself offered the greatest potential for income. i got a broker lic. and started doing homes loans in So Cal. theres plenty of money, options, time and reasons for failure. you pick what it will be, its your life.
    Nerf

    By kid A December 01, 2000, 12:12 PM

    quote:Originally posted by nerf:
    My wife is a Doctor (nkeezer)...
    Nerf

    nkeezer is your wife?

    By nkeezer December 01, 2000, 05:31 PM

    I've wanted to be a surgeon for about as long as I can remember. Money is a motivation (I think that's the case for almost everyone, though, and I'm not ashamed to admit it). But it's not *the* motivation. The 60-75K job that I was referring to on my original post is a job that I have now doing design things, not medicine. I don't have enough passion for that to make it a career. Advice appreciated though

    quote:Originally posted by nerf:
    My wife is a Doctor (nkeezer) and if $ is your motivation look else where. that should be your last motivation for that profession. if you started and stoped your not serious anyway. you think its hard, getting a BS or BA, Med school is sooooooooo much harder you cant imagine. if you dont want it youll never make it.
    Ahhhh educaton. i my self have a MS degree in finance from a good business school. what no one eluded to was you'll never make any real $ working for someone else. 40k doesn't cut it. multiply that by a factor of ten and now you talking. educaton, a degree is a piece of paper you can show some one. it may make your parents happy and look good hanging on the wall. A BS or BA tells employers you can stay the course and achieve a goal but not much more. Bill Gates got a degree? No Bill Gates got a business. ok, you get the point. if you want to be a CPA, MD, JD, you need the paper. dont forget that if you get your wize bang degree from a zero school, whats the point. think kids with Yale educations have trouble getting a job? Think a guy with a JD from USC law school sharpens pencils all day?
    I worked in the corp sector for a while and determined that working for yourself offered the greatest potential for income. i got a broker lic. and started doing homes loans in So Cal. theres plenty of money, options, time and reasons for failure. you pick what it will be, its your life.
    Nerf

    By nerf December 01, 2000, 06:08 PM

    nkeezer,
    on some level $ is always a concideration that is true. i guess what i wanted to say was if you invested your time and energies towards almost any thing else, financially you'd be much better off. here is your investment to be a surgeon, plastic OK you like money and these guys rack
    4 yrs for under grad (biology)
    MCAT test big time studying
    4 yrs med school, avg of 50 hrs per wk study time. that doesnt count hr in class. which be equiv to a 40 unit load.
    Ok youve made it your a MD. but now you face your boards 3 sets plus AMA boards while your doing your residencey.
    in your case Plastic Surg.
    first youll do 3 yr gen surg. resident Surg put in a min of 80-120 hr a week in the 1st yr. and make maybe 30 K per yr.
    yrs 2-3 80-100 hr per wk.
    ok now your ready for what youve always wanted Plastic surg.
    another 3 yrs of specialized training, again 80 -100 hr per wk.
    congrats your done, well almost now youve got to get cert in plastic surg.
    Still want to be a doctor?
    nerf

    By CajnDave December 01, 2000, 06:51 PM

    quote:Originally posted by nerf:
    nkeezer,
    on some level $ is always a concideration that is true. i guess what i wanted to say was if you invested your time and energies towards almost any thing else, financially you'd be much better off. here is your investment to be a surgeon, plastic OK you like money and these guys rack
    4 yrs for under grad (biology)
    MCAT test big time studying
    4 yrs med school, avg of 50 hrs per wk study time. that doesnt count hr in class. which be equiv to a 40 unit load.
    Ok youve made it your a MD. but now you face your boards 3 sets plus AMA boards while your doing your residencey.
    in your case Plastic Surg.
    first youll do 3 yr gen surg. resident Surg put in a min of 80-120 hr a week in the 1st yr. and make maybe 30 K per yr.
    yrs 2-3 80-100 hr per wk.
    ok now your ready for what youve always wanted Plastic surg.
    another 3 yrs of specialized training, again 80 -100 hr per wk.
    congrats your done, well almost now youve got to get cert in plastic surg.
    Still want to be a doctor?
    nerf


    Your forgot all the updating a doctor and all tech fields have to keep on top of.

    By nerf December 01, 2000, 06:59 PM

    ya, ill tell you. watching my wife, i couldnt do it. she gets calls at all hr of the day or night and she makes life and death decisions over the phone, scares the jingle out of my bells. if you think you have a choice after youve been admitted, think again.
    "god complex?, i am god" hits too close to home dome times.
    nerf

    By 100%TotallyNude December 01, 2000, 07:10 PM

    quote:Originally posted by Mr. Wampus:
    College is hard. It's supposed to be. Will it prepare you for a career? Not really, it's not what you learn in the classroom, it's the overall experience.

    College teaches you how to think critically, how to manage stress, how to juggle projects and schedules, and how to prioritize, how to deal with difficult teachers (bosses?) and so forth and so on. Guess what skills businesses want...

    All true. I am frequently amazed at the number of college educated idiots that come through the doors here though. In my experience critical thinking is an aquired, life-experience skill. All the college education does is give that skill a colorful nomenclature. Don't get me wrong, University of Edinburgh 1985, MS in Mathematics, but I've never been entirely convinced that a college education was very good as the sole basis for hiring someone after having dealt with mostly these kinds of people for the passed 15 years. The people that are winners succeed not nessessarily becuase they have a college education. Infact, I've noticed a distinct lack creative problem solving in a lot of them. We had one kid in my firm I work for now, went on to carve out a nice salary with a another, larger, company in this area becuase he understood microcoding (writing firmware) like an ace. I think he was at most a high school grad. He doesn't want for a job, ever.

    By nerf December 01, 2000, 07:25 PM

    100%
    too true, a friend of mine (yes i have 1 or 2) got out of the Navy and passed on his GI bill to get his CNE (cert net eng) i believe. this guy brings down the big cash now. its not education, rather motivation. people either find an excuse for failure or accept nothing until they achieve their goals. my biggest gripe with corp life was talent and skill are sometimes over looked in favor of some idiot willing to toe the corp mantra. im, how shall i say, blunt. i call em like i see em, boss, god, ceo. your either part of the problem or the solution. so i went in business for myself. best thing i ever did. wish i had started sooner.
    nerf

    By Mr. Wampus December 01, 2000, 09:43 PM

    Both very good points. I do not disagree. We have idiots in the company that I work for that seem to have risen to the highest level of their incompetence.
    My point to da_finster is that if you already have time invested in college, and you have the means to get there and assuming you have the grades to stay there, then I think you should follow through with what you've started. $40K is not that much money, especially if it also means the possibility of putting yourself on a different salary scale in the process.
    Having said that, I will also say that "money" should never be your ONLY reason for going to college. Go because you want to learn. And I would never hire anyone solely on the basis of a degree.
    Now, I'll step down off the soapbox and address something 1C%TN said. You went to U. of Edinburgh? Terrific, I just took Mrs. Wampus on a trip to Scotland and England (10th anniversary) we spent a few days in Edinburgh, and I can't wait to go back and spend more time there. Beautiful city. Do you still live "across the great pond?"

    By James December 02, 2000, 02:17 AM

    Not much left to say, so I guess I'll just ramble. I'd like to think of myself as a renaissance man, except I can't spell the word. I love to do many different things. My two most favorite passtimes are editing and computers. Lately, those two are converging into one.
    The point? I got a BA in media arts from a school who's media program sucked. What is media arts? Don't feel stupid, none of the employers know either. I couldn't get a job on anything related to media more prestigious than a student film. Why, because I did what I wanted, not what would land me a job.
    The degree helps though. Even though the only things I know about computers were self taught, having a degree makes my homegrown skills more desirable. (Don't ask me how.)

    The only people that I know who have made it are the ones who busted their ass to make their dreams a reality.

    To close this post out, I will leave you with my rules of life.
    (note: these are my rules and no one elses.)

    1. Be the best you can at what you do.
    2. There is always someone better than you.
    3. Integrating your knowledge from different areas gives you an edge that other people don't have.
    4. Always think creatively.



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