Home

News

Forums

Hardware

CPUs

Motherboards

Video

Guides

CPU Prices

RAM Prices

Compare Prices



Sharky Extreme : Hardware April 9, 2010





Be a Marketplace Partner








 Advertising Info

About the Double-Underlined Links

Hardware


 - CPU
 - Motherboards
 - Video Cards



 - Most Active Threads
 - Technical Support
 - CPUs & Overclocking


Latest News


- WD Doubles Capacity of Fastest SATA Drive
- Nvidia Announces Blazing GeForce GTX 480, 470 GPUs
- SanDisk's SSD As Rapid As It Is Reliable
- OCZ Launches Limited-Edition SSD
- AMD Offers Low-Profile DirectX 11 Graphics Card
News Archives

Features

- SharkyExtreme.com: Interview with Microsoft's Dan Odell
- SharkyExtreme.com: Interview with ATI's Terry Makedon
- SharkyExtreme.com: Interview with Seagate's Joni Clark
- Half-Life 2 Review
- DOOM 3 Review

Buyer's Guides

- February High-end Gaming PC Buyer's Guide
- November Value Gaming PC Buyer's Guide
- September Extreme Gaming PC Buyer's Guide

HARDWARE

  • CPUs


  • Motherboards


  • Video Cards


    internet.commerce
    Be a Commerce Partner














    internet.com
    IT
    Developer
    Internet News
    Small Business
    Personal Technology

    Search internet.com
    Advertise
    Corporate Info
    Newsletters
    Tech Jobs
    E-mail Offers



  •   


    Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 1TB Hard Drive Review
    By Vince Freeman :  April 10, 2008

    Introduction

    Desktop hard drives are pushed by two main factors, performance and capacity. End users want to cram as much data as possible onto a single drive, but also need data transfers and drive access to be lightning fast. This is a difficult dual-requirement for any hardware vendor, but when you add a low price into the equation, it gets that much tougher.

    So far, Seagate has delivered with each new revision of its popular Barracuda hard drive line, and the 7200.11 represents the latest flagship design, with capacities up to a full terabyte. That's where we're heading today, for the top-of-the-line Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 1TB, to see if it continues the Barracuda tradition into the eleventh generation.

    The Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 1TB Hard Drive

    The Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 1TB hard drive offers all the standard features that hardware enthusiasts demand. These include a 7200-RPM spindle speed, an average latency of 4.16 ms, SATA 3.0 Gb/s support, a MTBF of 750,000 hours, and an SATA NCQ interface. The onboard cache has been upgraded from the 16MB of the top 7200.10 drives, to a full 32MB for the 500GB, 750GB and 1TB 7200.11 models, while the 320GB drive falls back to 16MB.

    Data capacity is naturally a full 1TB, matching the top desktop hard drives on the market. To achieve this, the platter size of the Barracuda 7200.11 has increased to 250GB, up from the 188GB used in the 7200.10 series. Obviously, this equates into a 4-platter design, with a very easy transition to the 500GB and 750GB densities. Seagate lists the random read seek time at <8.5 msec and the random write seek time a bit higher at <9.5 msec, with the latter being a bit faster than the 7200.10 generation.

    Power usage specifications are also good, with an 11.6W seek, 12.0W operating and 8.0W idle averages, all of which are improvements over the Barracuda 7200.10 generation. The maximum start current of 3.0 amps of the 7200.11 drives is slightly higher than the 2.8 amps of the previous generation. Surprisingly, the Barracuda 7200.11 1TB weighs only 677 grams, which is lighter than the 720 grams of the 7200.10 750GB drive.

    The overall design of the Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 1TB hard drive is standard, and virtually identical to the various Barracuda 7200.9 and 7200.10 models. The drive back plate includes Serial ATA power and data connectors, along with the jumper arrangement, and the top of the drive housing is silver with the Seagate model number and specifications.

    The only issue we had is with Seagate's decision to set the jumpers to SATA 1.5 Gb/s mode by default. While backward compatibility is important, end users who do not notice the jumper setting will receive much lower burst mode performance on SATA 3.0 Gb/s platforms. Other drive manufacturers like Western Digital set the jumpers to SATA 3.0 Gb/s mode by default, and it's time that Seagate joins the crowd.

    The drive also offers features such as Second-Generation Perpendicular Recording (increased areal density). Adaptive Fly Height (more consistent read/write performance, Clean Sweep (automatic drive calibration), and the Seagate SoftSonic motor (for ultra-quiet Operation), while meeting RoHS requirements.


  • Page 1 The Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 1TB Hard Drive
    Page 2 Test Setup and Benchmark Software
    Page 3 PCMark05 Pro Hard Disk Performance
    Page 4 PCMark Vantage Hard Disk Performance
    Page 5 HD Tune Performance
    Page 6 HD Speed and SiSoft SANDRA XII 2008 Performance
    Page 7 Benchmark Analysis, Value and Conclusion


    Copyright(c) 2010 QuinStreet Inc. All Rights Reserved. Legal Notices | Licensing , Reprints , & Permissions | Privacy Policy