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- SharkyExtreme.com: Interview with Microsoft's Dan Odell
- SharkyExtreme.com: Interview with ATI's Terry Makedon
- SharkyExtreme.com: Interview with Seagate's Joni Clark
- Half-Life 2 Review
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  • The newest. The fastest. The future. Those are three things we live and die by at Sharky Extreme. And here today, we're going to bring you all three with an update of our Intel Roadmap for Consumer and Business CPUs.

    This roadmap shows what we believe Intel's future plans to be for their consumer and business CPUs and chipsets. We compiled this roadmap after speaking with multiple sources close to Intel. We then compared our sources' information and filtered it through our own knowledge to bring you this roadmap.

    And remember as you read, plans change. Changing market conditions require Intel to adapt. These are what we believe to be Intel's current plans. We will start with what we see are major trends in Intel's roadmap, then we will move on to give specifics about each of Intel's consumer market segments.

    RDRAM Here to Stay

    We have said it before and we will say it again. Like it or not, RDRAM is here to stay.

    Yes, it does cost an arm and a leg right now, but the prices have been falling and will continue to fall as yields improve and more manufacturers come online. One thing you may not realize is, while the price of purchasing a single RIMM on the after market is extremely high, the volume pricing that companies like Dell and Sony are facing is relatively low.

    Dell may have to pay a large premium for a 128MB RIMM versus a 128MB SDRAM DIMM, but you can be sure that they're not paying anything near the $600-700 a RIMM would cost if a consumer purchased it separately.





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